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Inflation — one of retirement’s biggest risks — is back

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1”Consumer Price Index — October 2021,” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, November 10, 2021.

2”Inflation, consumer prices for the United States,” Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, May 26, 2021.

3“Social Security benefits to jump 5.9% in 2022 in biggest increase in 40 years,” MarketWatch, October 13, 2021.

4“Social Security recipients get 5.9% increase, but rising prices will offset the boost,” CNN, October 13, 2021.

5Claiming Social Security, Chief Investment Office, Merrill and Bank of America Private Bank, 2020.

6Employee Benefits Research Institute, June 2020.

Important Disclosures

Opinions are as of 11/16/21 and are subject to change.

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Merrill, its affiliates, and financial advisors do not provide legal, tax, or accounting advice. You should consult your legal and/or tax advisors before making any financial decisions.

The Chief Investment Office (CIO) provides thought leadership on wealth management, investment strategy and global markets; portfolio management solutions; due diligence; and solutions oversight and data analytics. CIO viewpoints are developed for Bank of America Private Bank, a division of Bank of America, N.A., (“Bank of America”) and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (“MLPF&S” or “Merrill”), a registered broker-dealer, registered investment adviser and a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”).​ This information should not be construed as investment advice and is subject to change. It is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to be either a specific offer by Bank of America, Merrill or any affiliate to sell or provide, or a specific invitation for a consumer to apply for, any particular retail financial product or service that may be available.

“Bank of America” is a marketing name for the Retirement Services business of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”).

 

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